Recently, India selected a total of 50 municipalities all across the country to develop into ‘solar cities’, with each of these cities aiming at a minimum of 10% reduction in conventional energy demand within the next five years. This lofty objective will be carried out through the installation of several renewable energy technologies such as wind, solar, hydro and biomass energy. Depending on the availability of resources in each city, energy efficiency measures will be undertaken.

According to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), plans for 46 out of the 50 cities are already in place. The total cost for the project is close to INR236.9 million, out of which INR61.0 million have been sanctioned and released. For the preparation of the master plan, each city is eligible to receive up to INR5.0 million.

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Source: The Hindu

According to a consulting manager at the solar consulting firm Bridge to India, on the release of MNRE funds, it will be up to the municipal corporations to carry out the plans. The solar cities policy will make an important part of the government’s target of achieving 40GW of rooftop solar power by 2022.

The 50 cities part of the solar cities plan are: Guwahati, Jorhat, Hubli-Dharwad, Mysore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Mohali, Jodhpur, Bhubaneswar, Aizawl, Agra, Moradabad, Allahabad, Rajkot, Gandhinagar, Surat, Nagpur, Kalyan-Dombiwali, Thane, Aurangabad, Nanded, Gwalior, Rewa, Imphal, Kohima, Dimapur, Dehradun, Haridwar-Rishikesh, Chamoli-Gopeshwar, Chandigarh, Gurgaon, Faridabad,  Coimbatore, Vijayawada, Bilaspur, Raipur, Agartala, Panaji City & Environs, Itanagar, Hamirpur, Shimla Shirdi, Ajmer, New Town Kolkata, Howrah, Madhyamgram, New Delhi, Puducherry, Kochi and Bhopal.

“In-principle” approvals have already been granted to these five cities: Thiruvananthapuram, Jaipur, Indore, Leh and Mahbubnagar.

To set up affordable solar installations at your home, office or commercial building, get in touch with TMG Solar today.

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According to a new report on the Indian energy market, India holds the potential to conduct a sharp ramp up of its solar deployments in line with China’s booming solar power scene in the recent years.

The report titled ‘India’s Electricity Sector Transformation’, by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), a Cleveland-based researcher, and Indian energy analysis firm, Equitorials, states that as of June 2015, India had 4GW of installed solar power projects. India is now left with just seven years to achieve its ambitious 100GW by 2022 solar target.

IEEFA compares India with China, which seems to be way ahead in its solar power plans, increasing its installations from 2GW in 2011 to 13GW in 2013. Further, China set its national target for 2015 at 17.8GW for 2015 and installed 5GW in Q1 alone. The report claims a rapid ramp up of this scale is just as possible in India. IEEFA also forecast India installing 75GW by 2021-22, a lofty figure, but still falling short of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s 100GW target.

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Source: The Hindu

According to Jasmeet Khurana, senior consulting manager at Bridge to India, “Not just 75GW but also 100GW is possible by 2022. However, realistically looking at various government initiatives that seem to be in the works, our estimate would be in the range of 50-60GW by 2022.”

He added that extraordinary political will and bigger power sector reforms would be required to achieve anything beyond that target. The report also adds that the primary driver of deploying 75GW would be access to international finance. In a boost to India’s solar power plans, Japanese firm SoftBanks’ announced a US$20 investment into the Indian solar market, with plans for 20GW of deployment in July.

If you are looking to get solar installations at your home or office complex, give us a shout out and we’ll be at your doorstep sooner than you know!

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In July last year, the Adani Group signed a MoU with Tamil Nadu’s government, a move seen as necessary for large scale solar power generation in the state. According to the agreement, the Tamil Nadu Generation and Distribution Corporation (Tangedco, the State’s power utility) would purchase all the power produced that would be produced by the 648 MW Ramanathapuram district solar park at INR7.01 per unit for the next 25 years. Soon after, it came out that in Madhya Pradesh, the Adani Group had quoted a price of INR6.04 per unit. This was naturally followed by Opposition parties in Tamil Nadu protesting and demanding a white paper.

However, the controversy dates back to September 2014 when the Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission (TNERC) announced a solar power tariff order, which stated that any company generating solar power before September 11, 2015 would be eligible to receive a rate of INR7.01 per unit. This encouraged seven solar power developers, of which Adani Group was not a part, to file petitions asking the control period to be extended to two years, which were later rejected.

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Source: The Hindu

In 2014, the price of solar power came down by 14 per cent, which prompted the control period to be fixed for one year.

In an order in March last year, the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission notified that the capital cost of solar power had fallen to INR5.86 crore per MW which meant that solar power prices had dropped by INR1.14 per unit within this period.

Tamil Nadu has over 10 lakh households that consume above 500 units of solar power annually, with 5 lakh of these households in Chennai. Dravidian politics in the state are centred around populist schemes, which may cause the burden of high-cost power to be borne by high-end domestic users in cities and other industrial/commercial establishments.

Contact us today to take care of all your solar power needs and get access to our best and lowest cost plans.

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The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) announced a 30% subsidy to rooftop solar installations last year. The subsidy will reduce the cost of 25MW of government rooftop installations. However, many are not too excited about the subsidy, attributing it to future uncertainty.

The 30% subsidy was previously announced for installations up to 500kW in size, however owing to budgetary constraints, the cap was to 100kW. Additionally, residential solar is not included in the 25MW subsidy’s allocation.

Only those projects that have completed installation and payments in accordance with MNRE criteria are eligible for this subsidy. The subsidy is being supported by India’s National Clean Energy Fund (NCEF), which has been created by charging carbon fuel producers and is available for off-grid and decentralised solar installations for 2014-2015. This totals to INR142.5 crore (US$26.8 million) in subsidy payments for all government buildings.

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Source: The Hindu

For 2014-15, the MNRE budget is US$72.0 million, a huge fall from the US$246.0 million that was allocated last year. However, due to long, complicated processes for awards, MNRE was able to disburse only US$69.0 from its US$246.0 allocation.

A number of local rooftop installers are yet to receive subsidy approvals and are losing patience in the face of growing delays. While the subsidy scheme may have noble intentions and can reduce the time taken by solar power customers to pay back the upfront costs of installations, solar rooftop installation companies often jack up the prices to account for the risks associated with delayed payments. This only means the end customers ends up receiving no real benefit from the subsidy.

Bridge to India, a solar power consultancy has been quoted as saying the subsidy is “doing more harm than good” for the Indian rooftop solar market and 25MW represents a tiny fraction of this growing industry.

If you are looking for low-cost solar rooftop installations for your home, office or school, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us right away!

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Not long before the Global Himalayan Expedition (GHE) team pioneered the installation of a solar pico-grid in Tsering Dorjay’s village, Sumda Chenmo, he worked as a chef and trekking guide, making less than INR 12,000 per month for half the year. For months during the tourist season, he was away from his family. With the installation of the LED solar grid, the village experienced electricity for the very first time and Dorjay’s life took a turn for the better through his engagement with the GHE. He now works with the team on clean energy projects and makes INR22-25,000 per month.

Having fewer than 20 households, the village was not eligible for the government’s grid-based infrastructure development and electrification program. Its terrain and location only made the prospect of electricity bleaker. The village traditionally relied on kerosene lanterns, whose toxic fumes were detrimental to health.

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Source: The Hindu

The arrival of solar power in the village has played an important role in shaping people’s livelihoods. They can now work late into the night, thus improving the quality of locally manufactured products. Trekkers are now opting for homestays in the village, where they can now charge their mobile phones and laptops, thus providing an additional, and much needed source of income, to the village.

Next came village Shingo, where villagers were initially skeptical about the solar power initiative. When the village was illuminated using renewable energy for the first time, a great celebration was underway, welcoming the expedition teams with delicious food and traditional silk scarves. Shingo, too, will experience extended working hours and additional income streams.

So far, the GHE team has helped illuminate 10 villages and is on their way to 47 more villages. The installation of 21pico-grids has helped transform 1,800 villagers’ lives.

If you are looking for a solar power installation at your home, office complex or factory, contact us right away for cost-effective plans.

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Narendra Modi’s recent raise in the solar electric capacity target from 20,000MW to 100,000MW by 2022 appears to be a blunder, and a costly one at that. Potentially sabotaging his ‘Make in India’ ambitions, this $100 billion mistake could disrupt the entire electricity grid by raising the cost of electricity, which happens to be a critical manufacturing input.

With the highest interest rates among its Asian peers, India is uncompetitive on the electricity front too. Bulk power here costs one and a half times greater than in competing Asian nations. Solar power would be even more expensive, despite the huge subsidies involved, and ‘Make in India’ would take a hit.

While solar energy’s cost has halved in the last decade, it needs to go down further to make it competitive, especially in the face of 100,000MW of solar power by 2022, when it would constitute about a quarter of total power capacity. This could potentially upset the whole grid, since solar power would no longer be available on the setting of the sun, just when electricity demand would peak. Meeting such a huge peak in demand would require a massive cushion of idle thermal power, which is a significant hidden cost of solar power no one seems to notice yet.

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Source: The Hindu

Raising the target to 100,000MW of solar power by 2022 would only raise costs for manufacturers, which begs the question-Why must we hurry and not wait for solar prices to become competitive before going all out?

While solar power is highly subsidized, state levies, transmission and distribution costs make it an expensive deal at around INR9/unit when large captive power producing companies claim their costs hover at just around INR2/unit.

For all your solar power installation needs, get in touch with us today and have a look at our low-cost solutions.

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The Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) released a document in October last year detailing the progress on its ambitious 100GW of solar by 2022 target, which contained an update on the various schemes and projects that formed part of this target.

 

As of the end of 29 September, projects commissioned totalled 4,262 MW of solar energy. Among the states leading the pack with more than 100 MW of energy installed were Rajasthan with 1,174 MW, Gujarat with 1,000 MW, Madhya Pradesh with 649 MW, Maharashtra with 379 MW, Andhra Pradesh with 279 MW, Punjab with 200 MW and Tamil Nadu with 158 MW.

 

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Source: www. thehindu.com

 

The report suggests that states in Northern India are way ahead of their Southern counterparts. However, the South is soon catching up with more projects going online. All these developments are to be seen in the light of the consultancy firm Bridge to India releasing a Solar Map that reveals how the country is soon to see a massive jump in solar installations, with Southern states leading the way in 2016 as the 8.7GW currently under development coming online.

 

The new-found dominance of the Southern states is reflected in MNRE figures which set the amount of solar capacity commissioned by state policies in 2015-16 to 3,775MW. Tamil Nadu is the state expected to commission the highest capacity at 1,214MW, followed by Telangana at 1,116MW, Madhya Pradesh at 432MW and Andhra Pradesh at 350MW.

 

The Indian Government’s policies add an additional 570MW to the target, bringing it to a total of 4,345MW to be commissioned in 2015-16.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi urged state governments on Twitter to work on solar policy frameworks to facilitate implementation of solar projects , with regards to the development of ultra-mega solar power parks in 17 Indian states. After reviewing national solar projects including solar parks, he was quick to take to Twitter in a bid to encourage and hasten the nation’s solar power plans.

 

Need to install solar panels on your roof? Click here to initiate a discussion — we look forward to hearing from you!

 

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The Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) provides a subsidy of 15% of the benchmark cost involved in rooftop solar installations for the social sector, government, residences and institutions. This list does not cover commercial and industrial rooftops.

MNRE had allocated 40GW as part of India’s ambitious 100GW by 2022 solar power target and has already started implementing its ‘Grid-Connected Rooftop and Small Solar Power Plants Programme’ for solar projects that fall in the 1-500kW capacity range.

 

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Source: The Hindu

While MNRE’s huge rooftop energy target prevents it from providing central financial assistance to all solar rooftop projects, the projects that are eligible for the assistance will receive it from several government bodies such as State Departments, State Nodal Agencies, the Indian Renewable Energy Agency (IREDA), the Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI), empanelled government agencies and PSUs of central and state governments. Additionally, these plants are subject to the ‘Domestic Content Requirement’ guidelines drafted for Indian modules.  

Among the several benefits available to plants in the 1-500kW range are 10-year tax holidays, excise duty exemptions, custom duty concessions, accelerated depreciation benefits for commercial buildings, loans up to INR 150 million for renewable energy projects and up to 1 million for individuals under the priority sector lending requirements. Also part of the deal are loans for system aggregators at a concessional interest rate of 9.9-10.75%.  

Interestingly, MNRE has also sent out proposals to several NGOs and entrepreneurs for the implementation of pilot renewable energy projects, an area whose development it is closely judged on. These include innovative solar technologies for pumping, heating, lighting and drying in the rural areas of some Indian states, which also form part of the ministry’s ‘Scale Up of Access to Clean Energy for Rural Productive Uses’ programme.

If you need to install solar panels on your  factory, commercial complex or home, get in touch with us here for a high quality system at the lowest possible price. We look forward to hearing from you!

 

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